THE NECESSARY EVIL OF PLANNED COMMUNITIES?

November 26, 2021

I have designed within a number of planned communities, meaning neighborhoods where architectural guidelines are provided, sometimes dictated. At such communities, the architectural look and feel—from building height and size to materials and colors, from specific styles to window proportions—are regulated for the sake of “neighborhood compatibility, harmony, and consistency”–and other such righteous words.

NO BED OF ROSES, PART 3 OF 4: THE INTEGRITY OF MISTAKES

November 5, 2021

JEFF HABER: Along with design, you are an accomplished musician. What happened first for you growing up? Did you have a design bug? Did you have a music bug? Did you have any bugs at all? When did it start for you as a child?

ANTHONY POON: I would say I had a creative bug as a child. And it wasn’t specifically music or architecture. It was just the interest to make things, to build things, to take things apart.

NEW MEETS OLD: INTENTIONAL ACTS OF DISRUPTION

October 15, 2021

When adding to an existing building, the conventional agenda requests that the new structure match the old. A typical client request suggests that the point of connection between new and old be “seamless.” But there exists a different school of thought, a provocative one. Here, the new structure not only contrasts the old, but the addition is intentionally disruptive.

SEATTLE HEROES AND ICONS

September 24, 2021

Upon a visit to Seattle, I confronted three different buildings—all leaving a seductive imprint on the city and my memory.

– Seattle Central Library by Pritzker-laureate Rem Koolhaas,
– Musuem of Pop Culture by Pritzker-laureate Frank Gehry, and
– The Spheres at Amazon by corporate NBBJ.

The first two projects are by two of the most famous living architects on the planet. The third is by an anonymous company without the trappings of a sole Wright-ian genius, giving way to collaboration instead—for better or worse.

NO BED OF ROSES, PART 2 OF 4: THE FUTURE AND THE ARCHITECT’S CURSE

September 3, 2021

JEFF HABER: “Can you share maybe some moments where, ‘Wow, we didn’t really plan that, but that works beautifully.’ And maybe a, ‘Uuh, that worked a lot better on the computer than it’s doing right now’.”

ANTHONY POON: “You’ve touched on a sore spot. Maybe it’s just the curse of being an architect/artist, in that nothing is ever done. Nothing is ever complete. Everything always seems like it could be better.”

© Poon Design Inc.